SWITCH Cloud Blog


Backport to Openstack Juno the CEPH rbd object map feature

How we use Ceph at SWITCHengines

Virtual machines storage in the OpenStack public cloud SWITCHengines is provided with Ceph. We run a Ceph cluster in each OpenStack region. The compute nodes do not have any local storage resource, the virtual machines will access their disks directly over the network, because libvirt can act as a Ceph client.

Using Ceph as the default storage for glance images, nova ephemeral disks, and cinder volumes, is a very convenient choice. We are able to scale the storage capacity as needed, regardless of the disk capacity on the compute nodes. It is also easier to live migrate nova instances between compute nodes, because the virtual machine disks are not local to a specific compute node and they don’t need to be migrated.

The performance problem

The load on our Ceph cluster constantly increases, because of a higher number of Virtual Machines running everyday. In October 2015 we noticed that deleting cinder Volumes became a very slow operation, and the bigger were the cinder volumes, the longer the time you had to wait. Moreover, users orchestrating heat stacks faced real performance problems when deleting several disks at once.

To identify where the the bottleneck had his origin, we measured how long it took to create and delete rbd volumes directly with the rbd command line client, excluding completely the cinder code.

The commands to do this test are simple:

time rbd -p volumes create testname --size 1024 --image-format 2
rbd -p volumes info testname
time rbd -p volumes rm testname

We quickly figured out that it was Ceph itself being slow to delete the rbd volumes. The problem was well known and already fixed in the Ceph Hammer release, introducing a new feature: the object map.

When the object map feature is enabled on an image, limiting the diff to the object extents will dramatically improve performance since the differences can be computed by examining the in-memory object map instead of querying RADOS for each object within the image.

http://docs.ceph.com/docs/master/man/8/rbd/

In our practical experience the time to delete an images decreased from several minutes to few seconds.

How to fix your OpenStack Juno installation

We changed the ceph.conf to enable the object map feature as described very well in the blog post from Sébastien Han.

It was great, once the ceph.conf had the following two lines:

rbd default format = 2
rbd default features = 13

We could immediately create new images with object map as you see in the following output:

rbd image 'volume-<uuid>':
    size 20480 MB in 2560 objects
    order 23 (8192 kB objects)
    block_name_prefix: rbd_data.<prefix>
    format: 2
    features: layering, exclusive, object map
    flags:
    parent: images/<uuid>@snap
    overlap: 1549 MB

We were so happy it was so easy to fix. However we soon realized that everything worked with the rbd command line, but all the Openstack components where ignoring the new options in the ceph.conf file.

We started our investigation with Cinder. We understood that Cinder does not call the rbd command line client at all, but it relies on the rbd python library. The current implementation of Cinder in Juno did not know about these extra features so it was just ignoring our changes in ceph.conf. The support for the object map feature was introduced only with Kilo in commit 6211d8.

To quickly fix the performance problem before upgrading to Kilo, we decided to backport this patch to Juno. We already carry other small local patches in our infrastructure, so it was in our standard procedure to add yet another patch and create a new .deb package. After backporting the patch, Cinder started to create volumes correctly honoring the options on ceph.conf.

Patching Cinder we fixed the problem just with Cinder volumes. The virtual machines started from ephemeral disks, run on ceph rbd images created by Nova. Also the glance images uploaded by the users are stored in ceph rbd volumes by the glance, that relies on the glance_store library.

At the end of the story we had to patch three openstack projects to completely backport to Juno the ability to use the Ceph object map feature. Here we publish the links to the git branches and packages for nova glance_store and cinder

Conclusion

Upgrading every six months to keep the production infrastructure on the current Openstack release is challenging. Upgrade without downtime needs a lot of testing and it is easy to stay behind schedule. For this reason most Openstack installations today run on Juno or Kilo.

We release these patches for all those who are running Juno because the performance benefit is stunning. However, we strongly advise to plan an upgrade to Kilo as soon as possible.

 


Hack Neutron to add more IP addresses to an existing subnet

When we designed our OpenStack cloud at SWITCH, we created a network in the service tenant, and we called it private.

This network is shared with all tenants and it is the default choice when you start a new instance. The name private comes from the fact that you will get a private IP via dhcp. The subnet we choosed for this network is the 10.0.0.0/24. The allocation pool goes from 10.0.0.2 to 10.0.0.254 and it can’t be enlarged anymore. This is a problem because we need IP addresses for many more instances.

In this article we explain how we successfully enlarged this subnet to a wider range: 10.0.0.0/16. This operation is not a feature supported by Neutron in Juno, so we show how to hack into Neutron internals. We were able to successfully enlarge the subnet and modify the allocation pool, without interrupting the service for the existing instances.

In the following we assume that the network we are talking about has only 1 router, however this procedure can be easily extended to more complex setups.

What you should know about Neutron, is that a Neutron network has two important namespaces in the OpenStack network node.

  • The qrouter is the router namespace. In our setup one interface is attached to the private network we need to enlarge and a second interface is attached to the external physical network.
  • The qdhcp name space has only 1 interface to the private network. On your OpenStack network node you will find that a dnsmasq process is running bound to this interface to provide IP addresses via DHCP.
Neutron Architecture

Neutron Architecture

In the figure Neutron Architecture we try to give an overview of the overall system. A Virtual Machine (VM) can run on any remote compute node. The compute node has a Open vSwitch process running, that collects the traffic from the VM and with proper VXLAN encapsulation delivers the traffic to the network node. The Open vSwitch at the network node has a bridge containing both the qrouter namespace internal interface and the qdhcp namespace, this will make the VMs see both the default gateway and the DHCP server on the virtual L2 network. The qrouter namespace has a second interface to the external network.

Step 1: hack the Neutron database

In the Neutron database look for the subnet, you can easily find your subnet in the table matching the service tenant id:

select * from subnets WHERE tenant_id='d447c836b6934dfab41a03f1ff96d879';

Take note of id (that in this table is the subnet_id) and network_id of the subnet. In our example we had these values:

id (subnet_id) = 2e06c039-b715-4020-b609-779954fa4399
network_id = 1dc116e9-1ec9-49f6-9d92-4483edfefc9c
tenant_id = d447c836b6934dfab41a03f1ff96d879

Now let’s look into the routers database table:

select * from routers WHERE tenant_id='d447c836b6934dfab41a03f1ff96d879';

Again filter for the service tenant. We take note of the router ID.

 id (router_id) = aba1e526-05ca-4aca-9a80-01601cdee79d

At this point we have all the information we need to enlarge the subnet in the Neutron database.

update subnets set cidr='NET/MASK' WHERE id='subnet_id';

So in our example:

update subnets set cidr='10.0.0.0/16' WHERE id='2e06c039-b715-4020-b609-779954fa4399';

Nothing will happen immediately after you update the values in the Neutron mysql database. You could reboot your network node and Neutron would rebuild the virtual routers with the new database values. However, we show a better solution to avoid downtime.

Step 2: Update the interface of the qrouter namespace

On the network node there is a namespace qrouter-<router_id> . Let’s have a look at the interfaces using iproute2:

sudo ip netns exec qrouter-(router_id) ip addr show

With the values in our example:

sudo ip netns exec qrouter-aba1e526-05ca-4aca-9a80-01601cdee79d ip addr show

You will see the typical Linux output with all the interfaces that live in this namespace. Take note of the interface name with the address 10.0.0.1/24 that we want to change, in our case

 qr-396e87de-4b

Now that we know the interface name we can change IP address and mask:

sudo ip netns exec qrouter-aba1e526-05ca-4aca-9a80-01601cdee79d ip addr add 10.0.0.1/16 dev qr-396e87de-4b
sudo ip netns exec qrouter-aba1e526-05ca-4aca-9a80-01601cdee79d ip addr del 10.0.0.1/24 dev qr-396e87de-4b

Step 3: Update the interface of the qdhcp namespace

Still on the network node there is a namespace qdhcp-<network_id>. Exactly in the same way we did for the qrouter namespace we are going to find the interface name, and change the IP address with the updated netmask.

sudo ip netns exec qdhcp-1dc116e9-1ec9-49f6-9d92-4483edfefc9c ip addr show
sudo ip netns exec qdhcp-1dc116e9-1ec9-49f6-9d92-4483edfefc9c ip addr add 10.0.0.2/24 dev tapadebc2ff-10
sudo ip netns exec qdhcp-1dc116e9-1ec9-49f6-9d92-4483edfefc9c ip addr show
sudo ip netns exec qdhcp-1dc116e9-1ec9-49f6-9d92-4483edfefc9c ip addr del 10.0.0.2/16 dev tapadebc2ff-10
sudo ip netns exec qdhcp-1dc116e9-1ec9-49f6-9d92-4483edfefc9c ip addr show

The dnsmasq process running bounded to the interface in the qdhcp namespace, is smart enough to detect automatically the change in the interface configuration. This means that the new instances at this point will get via DHCP a /16 netmask.

Step 4: (Optional) Adjust the subnet name in Horizon

We called the subnet name 10.0.0.0/24. For pure cosmetic we logged in the Horizon web interface as admin and changed the name of the subnet to 10.0.0.0/16.

Step 5: Adjust the allocation pool for the subnet

Now that the subnet is wider, the neutron client will let you configure a wider allocation pool. First check the existing allocation pool:

$ neutron subnet-list | grep 2e06c039-b715-4020-b609-779954fa4399

| 2e06c039-b715-4020-b609-779954fa4399 | 10.0.0.0/16     | 10.0.0.0/16      | {"start": "10.0.0.2", "end": "10.0.0.254"}           |

You can resize easily the allocation pool like this:

neutron subnet-update 2e06c039-b715-4020-b609-779954fa4399 --allocation-pool start='10.0.0.2',end='10.0.255.254'

Step 6: Check status of the VMs

At this point the new instances will get an IP address from the new allocation pool.

As for the existing instances, they will continue to work with the /24 address mask. In case of reboot they will get via DHCP the same IP address but with the new address mask. Also, when the DHCP lease expires, depending on the DHCP client implementation, they will hopefully get the updated netmask. This is not the case with the default Ubuntu dhclient, that will not refresh the netmask when the IP address offered by the DHCP server does not change.

The worst case scenario is when the machine keeps the old /24 address mask for a long time. The outbound traffic to other machines in the private network might experience a suboptimal routing through the network node, that will be used as a default gateway.

Conclusion

We successfully expanded a Neutron network to a wider IP range without service interruption. Understanding Neutron internals it is possible to make changes that go beyond the features of Neutron. It is very important to understand how the values in the Neutron database are used to create the network namespaces.

We understood that a better design for our cloud would be to have a default Neutron network per tenant, instead of a shared default network for all tenants.